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Volume 12, Issue 1 (2023)                   J Police Med 2023, 12(1) | Back to browse issues page

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basharpoor S, ahmadi S. The Structural Model of Suicidal Ideation Based on Addiction to Social Networks and Psychological Maltreatment with Mindfulness Mediation in Adolescents. J Police Med 2023; 12 (1) : e11
URL: http://jpmed.ir/article-1-1137-en.html
1- Department of Psychology, Faculty of Educational Sciences & Psychology, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran , basharpoor_sajjad@uma.ac.ir
2- Department of Psychology, Faculty of Educational Sciences & Psychology, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran
English Extended Abstract:   (1311 Views)
Aims: Addiction to social networks and mental maltreatment are related to suicidal thoughts in adolescents. However, the mediating role of mindfulness in this relationship is unclear. The present study investigated the structural model of suicidal ideation based on addiction to social networks and psychological maltreatment with mindfulness mediation in adolescents.
Materials and Methods: The present research method is descriptive and correlation type (structural equations). The statistical population of this research consisted of all male students in the second year of high school studying in public schools in Ardabil City in 2021. From this population, a sample of 170 people was selected using the available sampling method and responded to Beck's suicidal ideation, Turel's social network addiction, Brown's mindfulness and Nash's psychological maltreatment questionnaires. To analyze the data, structural equation modelling was used using SPSS 25 and smartpls.4 software.
Findings: One hundred seventy subjects with an average age of 15.19±1.29 years participated in this research. The averages of the research variables were calculated as; suicide ideation indices 14.25±2.79, psychological maltreatment 50.62±15.72, social network addiction 50.64±10.69 and mindfulness 62.77±5.61. All values of Cronbach's alpha and composite reliability of research constructs were greater than 0.7 (Table 1). Also, the value of AVE for the constructs was greater than 0.5, indicating the research model's reliability and acceptable convergent validity. The mean square root of the variance extracted for each construct was higher compared to the correlation of that construct with other constructs; therefore, it can be said that in the research model, the latent variables interacted more with the questions related to themselves than with other constructs, so the model had good validity (Table 2). R Square values and Q2 criteria were used to check the structural model's fit. The R Square measure shows the influence of one or more exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. Three values of 0.19, 0.33 and 0.67 were considered as the criteria for weak, medium and strong values. The Q²predict criterion was also used to evaluate the model's predictive power. Values larger than zero indicate that PLS-SEM estimation is predictively appropriate.
The value of R Square for the construct of mindfulness was 0.349, and the construct of suicidal ideation was 0.526, which indicated a suitable value. The values of Q²predict showed that the endogenous variables of both constructs had a good predictive ability with their respective constructs. In order to determine the adequacy of the fit of the proposed model with the data of the indices, the values of each of these indices were between zero and one, and values close to or greater than 0.90 were a sign of the model's suitability. The Normed Fit Index (NFI) for this model was 0.96, which was within the acceptable range and since the standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) for the present model was obtained as 0.06, on the other hand, the acceptable interval for it was less than 0.08, so it can be said that the fitted model was suitable (Table 4).
After verifying the validity and reliability, the structural model of the research was evaluated, and the research hypotheses were examined. The results of the structural equation test showed that the coefficients of the direct path of psychological maltreatment on suicidal ideation (p=0.001; β=0.31), the coefficients of the path of addiction to social networks on suicidal ideation (p=0.001; 0.54) =β) was significant and the Bootstrap significance test showed that mental maltreatment (p=0.001; β=0.26; t=2.190) and addiction to social networks (p=0.001; β=0.11; t=1.119) were significantly mediated by mindfulness. According to the values of the significant t coefficients and the path coefficient obtained in the above models, it can be concluded that the significant t coefficients were more outstanding than 1.96, so the research hypotheses were confirmed at the confidence level of 95%. In addition, mental maltreatment and addiction to social networks significantly affected suicidal ideation with mindfulness meditation (Table 5).One hundred seventy subjects with an average age of 15.19±1.29 years participated in this research. The averages of the research variables were calculated as; suicide ideation indices 14.25±2.79, psychological maltreatment 50.62±15.72, social network addiction 50.64±10.69 and mindfulness 62.77±5.61. All values of Cronbach's alpha and composite reliability of research constructs were greater than 0.7 (Table 1). Also, the value of AVE for the constructs was greater than 0.5, indicating the research model's reliability and acceptable convergent validity. The mean square root of the variance extracted for each construct was higher compared to the correlation of that construct with other constructs; therefore, it can be said that in the research model, the latent variables interacted more with the questions related to themselves than with other constructs, so the model had good validity (Table 2). R Square values and Q2 criteria were used to check the structural model's fit. The R Square measure shows the influence of one or more exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. Three values of 0.19, 0.33 and 0.67 were considered as the criteria for weak, medium and strong values. The Q²predict criterion was also used to evaluate the model's predictive power. Values larger than zero indicate that PLS-SEM estimation is predictively appropriate.
The value of R Square for the construct of mindfulness was 0.349, and the construct of suicidal ideation was 0.526, which indicated a suitable value. The values of Q²predict showed that the endogenous variables of both constructs had a good predictive ability with their respective constructs. In order to determine the adequacy of the fit of the proposed model with the data of the indices, the values of each of these indices were between zero and one, and values close to or greater than 0.90 were a sign of the model's suitability. The Normed Fit Index (NFI) for this model was 0.96, which was within the acceptable range and since the standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) for the present model was obtained as 0.06, on the other hand, the acceptable interval for it was less than 0.08, so it can be said that the fitted model was suitable (Table 4).
After verifying the validity and reliability, the structural model of the research was evaluated, and the research hypotheses were examined. The results of the structural equation test showed that the coefficients of the direct path of psychological maltreatment on suicidal ideation (p=0.001; β=0.31), the coefficients of the path of addiction to social networks on suicidal ideation (p=0.001; 0.54) =β) was significant and the Bootstrap significance test showed that mental maltreatment (p=0.001; β=0.26; t=2.190) and addiction to social networks (p=0.001; β=0.11; t=1.119) were significantly mediated by mindfulness. According to the values of the significant t coefficients and the path coefficient obtained in the above models, it can be concluded that the significant t coefficients were more outstanding than 1.96, so the research hypotheses were confirmed at the confidence level of 95%. In addition, mental maltreatment and addiction to social networks significantly affected suicidal ideation with mindfulness meditation (Table 5).
Conclusion: The results of this study show that in addition to the direct effect of addiction to social networks and psychological maltreatment on suicidal ideation, mindfulness also acts as a mediating variable on the indirect effects of addiction to social networks and psychological maltreatment on suicidal ideation.
Clinical & Practical Tips in POLICE MEDICINE: Considering the higher prevalence of suicidal ideation in adolescents as a vulnerable group, the results of this study can help design preventive programs and hold educational workshops for continuous training in suicide ideation control by military counsellors, psychologists and staff. Also, due to the significant protective function that mindfulness seems to play in reducing risk factors for increased suicidal behaviour, mindfulness-based interventions help treat people who have suicidal thoughts or engage in suicidal behaviours.

Acknowledgements: Hereby, all the compassionate cooperation of the director, counsellor and teachers of the schools of Ardabil city in Iran and all the students participating in the research are highly appreciated.
Conflict of Interest: The article's authors state that there is no conflict of interest regarding the present study.
Authors Contribution: Sajjad Beshrpoor, presenting the idea and design of the study; Shirin Ahmadi, data collection and analysis. All the authors participated in the initial writing of the article and its revision, and all of them accept the responsibility of the accuracy and correctness of the contents of the present article by finalizing the present article.
Funding Sources: This research was carried out with the financial support of the Research Vice-Chancellor of Mohaghegh Ardabili University.
Table 1) Cronbach's alpha, composite reliability and average variance extracted
Research structure Cronbach's alpha composite reliability (CR) average variance extracted (AVE)
Addiction to social networks 0.857 0.860 0.778
Mindfulness 0.761 0.773 0.575
Suicide 0.899 0.908 0.567
Psychological Maltreatment 0.907 0.928 0.729

Table 2) Divergent validity of research constructs
Structure of research addiction to social networks mindfulness suicide Psychological Maltreatment
addiction to social networks 0.82 - - -
mindfulness 0.669 0.758 - -
suicide 0.662 -0.441 0.752 -
Psychological Maltreatment 0.758 -0.623 0.596 0.853

Table 3) structural model fit indices
Structure R Square Q²predict
Mindfulness 0.349 0.275
Suicidal ideation 0.526 0.477

Table 4) The main indicators of the final
 evaluation of the quality of the model
Index Standard model Estimated model
SRMR 0.066 0.066
NFI 0.96 0.96

Table 5) Path analysis of direct effects
between the main research variables
path hypothesis Direct path coefficient t value p Value Result
1 Psychological Maltreatment on suicidal ideation 0.315 2.139 0.002 confirmation
2 Psychological Maltreatment on mindfulness -0.562 4.929 0.001 confirmation
3 Mindfulness on suicidal ideation -0.456 3.217 0.001 confirmation
4 Addiction to social networks on suicidal ideation 0.546 6.717 0.001 confirmation
5 Addiction to social networks on mindfulness -0.252 2.150 0.003 confirmation


 









 

Figure 1) Measurement model coefficients and T values
Article number: e11
Full-Text [PDF 655 kb]   (1013 Downloads)    
Article Type: Descriptive & Survey | Subject: Police Related Psychology
Received: 2022/10/3 | Accepted: 2023/04/8 | Published: 2023/04/25

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